Business English Emails: Learn to clarify a procedure - formal & informal emails

Clarify a company procedure. Let's compare a formal email with an informal email.


In the email below, Max Cash, the administrative manager at Lanister Corporation, is writing an internal email to clarify the procedure for reimbursements in the company.

This is a great example of a professional email. It’s well-organized to communicate clearly and the language is professional and appropriate.


A Formal Email

In the email below, Max Cash, the administrative manager at Lanister Corporation, is writing an internal email to clarify the procedure for reimbursements in the company.

This is a great example of a professional email. It’s well-organized to communicate clearly and the language is professional and appropriate.



An Informal Email

Now take a look at an informal email. In this email, Max uses a much more informal style and much more informal language to communicate with his colleagues.

It’s clear from this informal email that Max knows his colleagues very well so he doesn’t need to write a formal email.

Formal vs. Informal Emails

When? Only write an informal email in business when you know the other person or people very well.

Greeting: Be careful to write an appropriate greeting. Don’t write ‘Hey, what’s up?’ in a formal email, for example.

Sign Off: Be careful to use an appropriate sign off. It’s okay to write, ‘Talk later’, or ‘Cheers’ if you know the person very well.

Language: It’s fine to use simple language in an informal email, but use more professional language in a formal email.

Direct: In an informal email, you can use direct language because you know the person well. In a formal email, use soft language so you don’t annoy the other person.




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